Abbeydale Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Abbeydale Golf Club

About Abbeydale Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Abbeydale Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Abbeydale Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Abbeydale Golf Club

Recognised as one of the districts finest, the course was designed by the famous architect Herbert Fowler, also renowned for other such designs as Walton Heath and The Berkshire. Set in 111 acres of the beautiful Beauchief Estate it provides an absorbing challenge for golfers of all handicaps and retains some of the best views of the Derbyshire country side to be seen anywhere from Sheffield. The course, which won the “Toro Green keeper of the Year” award in 1998 has undergone extensive refurbishment over the last few years is renowned for it’s manicured appearance and superb putting surfaces which characterise Fowler’s design ethos of strategy and reward.

Abbeydale Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

It’s important to note here that I’m referring not to a speed but a distance past the hole. As I mentioned earlier golfers don’t relate to speeds (velocities) which change from green to green depending on the conditions anyway. But what does not change (at least not very much) is the distance the optimum speed putts roll past the hole which is in a general way a measure of how fast the ball was rolling when it reached the cup after passing through the lumpy donut. That distance is 17 inches. Years of experiments have shown me that the optimum speed for making putts is one that would if the hole were covered or missed roll the ball 17 inches past the back edge. That extra 17 inches of speed is enough to keep the maximum percentage of putts on line through the lumpy donut yet not so fast they won’t stay in the hole when they hit it.

Speed Is More Important Than Line 191

Something Extra for the Technically Oriented

Understand that 17 inches is an average. The actual optimum distance past varies a little (an inch or two) with almost every putt on every green depending on its surface conditions. Uphill and downhill putts have slightly different optimum speeds although not by as much as you might expect. Because downhill putts have gravity helping them stay on-line as they roll through the lumpy donut their optimum speeds tend to be a little lower as they reach the hole so they still roll close to 17 inches past (when they miss the hole) before they stop. As explained earlier uphill putts are being pulled off-line by gravity every ti me they hit an imperfection. To keep them on-line the optimum speed tends to be faster but because they are rolling uphill if they pass the hole they also stop about 17 inches past.

Larger variations in the 17-inch distance occur on different grasses. On seaside greens where the grain of Bermuda grass is very strong I have seen optimum putting speeds roll balls as much as 36 inches past the back edge of the hole. Compare this to U.S. Open greens which I’ve measured with optimum speeds that roll balls only five inches past the cup. But don’t worry about these variations.

Every test I’ve ever done with all levels of golfers (including Tour pros) proves that one of the most difficult tasks in golf is rolling putts the proper speed. The best you can do is train yourself to get very good at having one consistent touch for rolling putts at the hole. And that best speed is – you got it – 17 inches past.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

AIM FEEL PUTTER FITTING PATH FACE ANGLE POWER SOURCE TOUCH STABILITY I MPACT PATTERN RHYTHM ATTITUDE FLOW-LINES RITUAL ROUTINE GREEN-READING

Defining How the Ball Rolls

Before getting into the mechanics of the putting stroke I’ll define some vocabulary which will help keep things simple and easy to understand throughout the book. In our Scoring Game Schools we routinely use words or phrases that you may not be familiar with. We do this because we’ve found that many golfers refer to the same things using different terms and sometimes use the same terms to describe different things.

Obviously this can lead to unnecessary confusion and disagreement. It helps to be more explicit in how you describe and define some of these concepts. For ex ample my staff and I never talk about “putting to there ” or putting “that way.”

Rather we talk about the “Aimline” you intend to start the ball rolling on the “ini tial line” you actually start the ball on and where the “ball track” goes after that.

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

When we talk about the “ball-hole” line for any putt we mean the straight line between where the ball sits (before you putt it) and the hole (Figure 4.1.2). How ever because the hole is always your ultimate target some golfers call this their

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Abbeydale Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

Abbeydale Golf Club